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tempore: without objection, the house stands adjourned until >> this change would have the implications not only for federal benefit programs like social security but also for income taxes. it would also affect the poverty threshold and guidelines published by the bureau of labor statistics, which in turn are used to determine eligibility for many low-income benefit programs. the congressional budget office recently estimated that moving to a change it cpi for vermin- wide would reduce the federal deficit by. .340 billion about 2/3 comes from reduced federal benefits. there are options other than the chained cpi for determining cost-of-living adjustments, and one of those is moving to a consumer price index for older americans. today we will have five speakers to discuss a broad range of issues related to the cost of living adjustment. each speaker will give a presentation and then we will open up for audience questions. bios are in your packets so i will not spend a lot of time on introductions, because we have a lot to cover. the packets also includes the presentations and the stat sh
with the bartender who changed political history. tonight, the footage you haven't seen including the heroic act that convinced scott prody he needed to release the tape. >> looking back on it, it's one of the proudest moments of my life. >>> they're refighting the vietnam war over at cpac. >> vietnam was winnable, but people in washington decided we would not win it. >>> howard fineman has a wrap-up of the conservative conclave. >>> plus more republican obstruction of appointees has democrats fuming. i'll ask former senator tom daschle if harry reid needs to revisit the filibuster reform. >>> and yesterday it was the president. now democratic leadership looks like they may cave on social security. i'll ask the big congressional panel where they stand. >>> good to have you with us, folks, thanks for watching. people around the country are still buzzing about the man behind the 47% video who revealed his identity on this show last night. now, today the world is getting to know the real scott prody. he described himself on this program as a regular guy. he's got bills to pay, he struggles in the m
become a movement, you can try to change with the government or negotiate with the government. deps on your strategy. start small, focus, build around local nonpolitical issues, which is where you learn the technology of nonviolent struggle. then you achieve a little victory. then the people start joining because the people who join the things which are successful. and if you are branded well and know how to communicate, you have a movement, and then see how the government will deal with it, because the more oppressive government is, the less space for use of the suppression. because they already are using every single way of censorship, and they're, after 30 years, i don't find them very flexible in dealing with the new ways of protesting. the more closed the system, the more oppressive regime, the less flexible. really flexible regimes are not the most -- when you look at the really flexible regimes who learned fast, like the one in venezuela or russia, they're not north koreas them real problem with north korea, once they're there, they're cemented in their own little thing. so w
's relationship with her changes, changes from uncle cleve, the godfather, to a romantic interest. cleveland starts sending her letters with poems and sends her roses, and it's the full court press on courting her. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> you're watching booktv. and now former florida governor jeb bush argues that the nation's immigration policy should be overhauled to reflect our current economic needs, but also should be b clear enough to enforce properly. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> now, our love whered president finish beloved president ronald reagan passed away almost ten years ago. but as many in this audience know, it seems nearly impossible to follow political news without hearing some reference to our 40th president. his memory, his name and, fortunately, his legacy seem to be ubiquitous as our country grapples with the challenges of our time. for many years, probably starting with the day after president reagan left office in 1989, there's been a famous question often asked when this is a particularly vexing problem facing
the demands of the president and marco rubio. while all of this might signal a change of seasons, it probably won't change the game. within the republican party, things are getting down right frosty, lindsey graham is going after jeb bush for his refusal to support path to citizenship. yesterday bush tried to make amended. >> i talked to senator graham and he said that we're in sync on this, caused on our proposal in the book that clint and i wrote; that the objectives are the same. >> michael: the riff between bush and graham is one example of the cracks starting to show in the republican ice. graham himself is facing a primary challenge to his seat from the founder of the conservative gay group go proud. and center mccain had challenging moment of his own, after he blasted rand paul last week. he today got stuck on an elevator with him. that 30-second ride probably felt more like a 13-hour filibuster. and finally we get to the spring freeze the end of gun safety legislation that was just beginning to bloom. gun safety advocates are still pushing for closing the gun
, not a popularity contest. not to move. people are voting this way. change all the doctrine and yet at the same time that is a challenge for the american church. how do you keep up with what people consider to be modern times, but keep to a doctrine that is obviously based in t way past, in history? >> this is an issue. because people do have it in their minds that this is a democracy and that polls are the things that make the decisions. it's not. we're dealing with what we call eternal truth. the eternal truth of our faith and don't really change that much. we said earlier in the program, the key is the way you delivery the message. that's what people will look for in the next 40 years. >> it will endear him to the audience or push him to the audience. john paul ii, what people loved about him was the delivery of the message in a personal way. >> have the ability to engage the culture and have the conversation is key. >> pope john paul was 59, only two years older than me, when he became the pope. and we watched him become a grandfather. benedict walked out to the world statement stage as a grandf
understand the change that andrew jackson brought to the white house? the first westerner. we have virginia presidents from the old south before that. he grew up in the frontier. the change is enormous. socially, the change is enormous. he is not of the old planter class of the south that previous presidents had been from. not like a newly linder either. he brings different values and the french ambitions to the white house. was a widowgh he the president, the ghost of his wife, over the white house during his years there. why is that? >> she was the woman of his life. he loved her. when she died just a few months before he was inaugurated, he was a rest. he spent all of his time thinking about her and her memory and having her portraits in his bedroom so he could think of her. it really changed the way the first administration wins. >> we need to go into the campaign of 1822 understand the presidency. 1828 was the year of what? how did it change? >> it was the first time we did not have a majority of electors. the whole election was given over to the house of representatives. we had these
. >>> crews are busy working on some big changes on the golden gate bridge, which go into effect next wednesday. that is when toll takers go away, and a new electronics system goes online. drivers will have to use fast track. drivers who do nothing will be caught by cameras, and a toll bill will be sent to them in the mail. >>> on wall street today, technology stocks helped drive the major indexes down. the dow was office 90 points, or .6%. the nasdaq dropped 32, or about 1%, and closed at 3,222. leading the tech stocks on their decline was oracle, which reported an unexpected drop in 3rd quarter sales. the redwood city based company took a beating with investors with its stock down almost 10% today. analysts say oracle effects other tech stocks disproportionately, because it reports its earnings earlier than most other tech companies. >>> sales force.com has approved a 4 for 1 stock split. the change will take effect on april 3, increasing the number of shares from 400 million, to 1.6 billion. the shares of the software management company closed at a record high on march 1, when sale
marriage licenses at city hall. a lot has changed. the shift is to the support for gay marriage. we have seen prominent republicans come out in support of it. how does that change your job next week before the supreme court? >> really, it doesn't and shouldn't effect what is a legal case that we are looking at interpretation of the u.s. constitution. things like public opinion polls and the political pressure that could be brought to bear really are not -- that's just not for a legal case like this. >> scott: you think the justices are more or less immune to that? >> i think the justices are used to being sucked into a political debate. their limited role as judges to interpret law. >> scott: what is the thing you and your team have to make sure the justices hear on tuesday? >> one of the most important things is the justices realize this is not just an issue of marriage, but states' rights and federalism. it would be unfortunate to have same-sex marriage imposed. marriage redefined for all 50 states by the intervention of the federal courts, thus, ending a debate that continues to go on
to see some changes to all of that and he'll join us next. plus the last time i checked the supreme court did not overturn roe v. wade, either someone forgot to tell state legislatures that or they just don't give a damn. and hate groups are growing haith crimes are on the rise as a result. all of that and much more just ahead in "the war room." bs'ing them with some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying to look out for us. [ male announcer ] it's red lobster's lobsterfest our largest selection of lobster entrees like lobster lover's dream or new grilled lobster and lobster tacos. come in now and sea food differently. now, buy one lobsterfest entree and get one 1/2 off with a coupon at redlobster.com. fruit just got cooler. fruit on one side, cool on the other. ice breakers duo a fruity cool way to break the ice.
of their influence, changing the world. this whole idea of leadership was challenged. you can even argue if you look at this that after they formalized this, they actually lost a little bit and you can argue about the influence. it got me thinking about the world of elected officials that have this formal authority. >> you haven't done time, have you? >> no, i have not done time. but this idea that we have to wait around for the white horse. i have been waiting around and somewhere expecting it was arnold schwarzenegger. he married maria shriver, that was good, then he got in and president obama had been under that notion to the notion that we had to wait around for someone else to solve our problems. it got me walking down this path. what is happening with these popular movement here in america, occupy movement, the tea party, et etc. there is an energy out there. >> we are talking about estonia, south korea, a lot of people in search of innovation at the head of what we have. they're places throughout the globe that have a learning curve in terms of what you're talking about. >> he's going to come
enforcement more effective tools. the substitute also incorporates a number of changes, the result of suggestions from senator grassley and his staff. we have been working on this since january. tried to be responsive to the ranking member's concerns and suggestions, and have reached across the aisle to other senators. as a a.t.f. whistleblower, senator grassley has been the lead senator in whistleblower legislation, was a a.t.f. whistleblower, who testified last congress that the existing laws are toothless and they can help law enforcement -- can't help law enforcement, and that's why law enforcement consistently has called for firearms trafficking statute that can be effective and go after straw purchasers. we need now is to create better law enforcement tools. and i think this will -- the senators can join together on this will close a very dangerous loophole in the law that mexican drug cartels and gangs and other criminals have exploited for too long. stop illegal trafficking the firme arms act is important. this week -- the firearms act is important. this week the "usa today
will harm average americans, drive up unemployment, change america permanently in negative ways and on the other hand will be supported by businessmen who will never vote for a republican anyway? as far as i can tell you that republican talk radio and tv shows will vote for it. there's many consequences to amnesty but if amnesty goes through then america will become california and no republican will ever win another election. [applause] richard nixon and ronald reagan will never elect another republican. want see why democrats amnesty why on earth is marco rubio and these bushes pushing for it. they are panicked and demoralized after the last election. stop panicking republicans. liberal writing the obituary of the republican party right now remind me of new homeowners at the height of the housing bubble. people announce their complete triumph moments before their crushing defeat. our job -- our job is to ensure democrats have that crushing defeat. thank you and ill take some questions. [applause] >> go ahead. >> do you believe that chris christie should have been invited to cpa
: are there any senators in the chamber wishing to vote or change their vote? the presiding officer: on this vote the yeas are 45, the nays are 54. under the previous order requiring 60 votes for the adoption of this amendment, the amendment is not agreed to. ms. mikulski: move to reconsider. mr. mccain: move to lay on the table. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. brown: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from ohio. mr. brown: i ask unanimous consent to speak up to two minutes and after my remarks the senior senator from arizona be recognized. the presiding officer: is there objection? is there objection to the modified request? without objection. mr. brown: madam president, thank you. i want to not yet call up, i've been working with chairwoman mikulski on this until they get an agreement but i'll just discuss for a moment amendment 83 i'm cosponsoring with senator isakson of georgia. it really does help us restore as chairmanwoman mikulski has been working towards, regular order in this chamber. this is an amendment having to do with some chang dealing -- language de
conservative. in a cnn exclusive, senator rob portman explains the personal reasons behind his change of heart. >>> and a bizarre and tragic medical mystery. a man dies after receiving a transplanted kidney tainted with rabies. how could this happen in the united states of america? how many other people are at risk right now? i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." forget all those wacky scenes of north korea's leader joking around with dennis rodman. the united states, the obama administration, right now taking the north's threats of a nuclear attack very seriously. the pentagon has just announced it will beef up america's defense missile systems out on the west coast. in california, oregon, washington state. let's go straight to cnn's pentagon correspondent chris lawrence, watching what's going on. chris, a lot of us are stunned by this decision but update us on what is going on. >> wolf, we just came out of a briefing where we learned the pentagon is going to spend a billion dollars to put new intercepter missiles on the west coast. now, that plan includes react investigating a mi
biography of rachael jackson. understand the amount of change that kantor jackson brought to washington. >> -- andrew jackson brought to washington. >> he is the first westerner. we have va. presidents before that. jackson is somebody completely different. he grew up in the frontier. the change is enormous. socially, the change is enormous. --n though he is a planter, he was not like a new england int -- new englanders island -- either. he brought very different values and very different ambitions. >> even though he was awaited -- would president. >> she was the one of his life. a few months, at before he went to be inaugurated, and he was bereft. he spent all of his time thinking about her and her memory and having her pictures, portraits in the bedroom. it really changed. >> we need to delve into the campaign of 1828 to understand the presidency. -- how did itr of change? >> it was the first time we did not have the majority of electors. the election was given over to the house of representatives. he'll have these multiple competing factions in the house of representatives. you have c
of politics. let's talk in a broad sense about the changing country and the changing political parties. >> one of the major things that we forget, because we're so comfortable with the united states being a two-party system and that being what democracy is or at least is here, we forget that during the early republic, there wasn't a two- party system, that the founding fathers hated parties and thought they would be terrible for democracy. there was this generation, particularly martin van buren who said we need to have an ordered, structured system, of making political things happen and that's the parties. we have to have a philosophy. we have to show up together and vote on the same thing and we have to hang together, or these sections of the country or these differences in the democracy will spin out of control, and actually they did. >> how did washington, d.c. change over these 12 years? >> it grew like crazy. at the beginning, of course, it was basically just kind of a big -- with trees and dirt and then there would be a house and a building there. then it became actually a city and it b
. then he changed it to paths of prosperity. that's the one he stuck with today. well to paraphrase shakespeare a ryan budget by any other name would still smell unsweet. it would eliminate most of obama-care, it would repeal financial regulation, and it would make major cuts to medicare. sounds great. here he is trying to convince americans that they want this tired 'ol lemon of a plan. >> it's a path to prosperity, a responsible balanced budget. we believe we owe the american people a balanced budget. for the third straight year we've delivered. >> michael: congressman, what you owe the american people is respect. they're smart enough to understand that you introduced the exact same budget during the election and you lost. jay carney today said that the president wants to trim medicare but with a scalpel not an axe. and ryan let slip his real plan for medicare system. >> this to us is something that we're not going to give up on because we're not going to give up on destroying the healthcare system for the american people. >> michael: that was bushan it was so man. was it a freudi
to do more and do it faster to change the way medicare and medicaid pay for healthcare. how to boost the country's economy, we learned from economists the number one way to reduce healthcare spending is to end fee-for-service. everyone agree that fee-for-service drives volumes, excesses, and waste. we know this encourages the wrong things. that's why healthcare reform changed incentives to providers. and medicare and medicaid are testing different programs to determine which work best. in october, medicare rolled out a program with a simple yet revolutionary premise. medicare is going to pay hospitals to get the job done right the first time. the hospitals are penalized if patients are readmitted too soon after being discharged. communities from montana to maryland are rising to the challenge. in miss sue los angeles montana, the local earth is partnering with medicare on care transitions. under the program, patients at reaction of readmission will get extra help making the transmission from the hospital back to the community. today we'll hear about data showing significant first ste
change the reality. you could begin to change the reality between the two sides. the problem is, we're stuck. there's a stalemate. we have disbelief. and if you want to move towards peace, you have to re-establish belief and even if you had talks tomorrow, you have to establish something is going to be difference because of those two talk peps. >> mark, can i get your take as we heard the ambassador there and what needs to be done? we now have information about the secretary of state john kerry's surprise visit with mahmoud abbas. what does that signal to you about where the american diplomacy commitment stands with trying to work for peace? >> first of all, good morning from jet stream. i think we have one advantage and that is because expectation res very low. if the leadership is trying to leave here and surprise people and see if we can never these move the process forward. our government, the government of israel is ready for the immediate resumption of peace talks without any precontinues whatsoever. up until now, the palestinian side has not been ready. i'm hopefulful that's
a change in the way business is done here would affect other states who may be lined up also with laws that preempt or somehow trump federal law? >> well, as deputy solicitor general said. if the federal law is just viewed as a floor here. for example, if arizona wins, then he said states can impose additional requirements on registration, and the federal lawl itself becomes a nullity. that is the fear of a lot of organizations from the orgses that brought the challenge to the league of women voters that filed an amicus brief supporting the challengers. congress' intent here was to make registration easier. they fear that if arizona wins, then other states are going to impose other kinds of requirements, not just proof of citizenship. so that is the real concern. if arizona loses, there is no change. on the other hand, the final word may rest with congress. whatever the supreme court does, congress could go and amend the national voter registration act. >> ifill: sounds like there could be a consequential ruling. >> it's definitely a very important case and playing out against this bac
're trying to do. but governor bush seemed to change his stance somewhat during a series of recent interviews prompting tough criticism from senate majority leader harry reid. >> let's wait for a few minutes and see how jeb bush changes his mind again. his opinion on immigration is not evolving. it's devolving. he keeps going backwards. i think he's frankly made a fool of himself the last 24 hours. frankly, on this issue, i don't think jeb bush is a florida leader. i think marco rubio is. bush has been elected to nothing lately. rubio is the leader on immigration. >> okay. joe, a new poll by latino decisions shows immigration reform is by far the most important issue for hispanic voters. that's by the economy and jobs, education and health care. >> john heilemann, let's talk, john heilemann, about your next book. bush -- "game change 2016." i think this may have to be the opening scene of jeb getting out of a cab in the middle of the dark, you know, in a cold march morning and walking into the "today" show when announcing that he's changed his mind. i mean, the second i heard it, i said, the
that is going to change some. there are going to be some people who see us, see me in particular as having taken sides. so i often get asked why did you do this? and i think the fact is for both of us we spent 40 years building some capital and a reputation and they're comes a point you feel like you need to use that capital because the stakes are too high, the consequences are great, and we both believe that we are had a really critical point in this political system. we face huge problems in the country. short term and long term. and if we are going to leach the system of problem solvers and in up with people who say things like richard murdock, the new republican nominee for the senate in indiana said yesterday which is my idea of compromise is on the move to accept my position. if that is how we are going to be faced with making policy decisions that are going to be very tough and painful for americans as all major changes in social policy whether the expanded government or contract government do they disrupt people's lives almost by definition and you can't make that work and create a sense
change at that land mark bridge. >>> the u.s. supreme court takes up prop 8 and same-sex marriage in 5 days. we talked with the couple who are at the center of the lawsuit. they are one of two couples who are plaintiffs in the biggest civil rights cases. on tuesday the u.s. supreme court will hear arguments and whether proposition 8 is unconstitutional. >> for a family, it is an important struggle and there has been sacrifice and at the same time it has been -- it is a huge honor. >> they will travel to washington, d.c. for the arguments and their twin sons will join them in the courtroom. and ktvu's david stevenson is heading to washington, d.c. to cover the arguments over prop 8 before the u.s. supreme court. we will have live reports from him throughout the day on monday and tuesday. >>> new tonight at 6:00 p.m. a lot of work going on at the golden gate bridge. ktvu's consumer editor tom vacar is live with what drives can expect, including a change with the speed limit there. tom? >> reporter: all of the changes, the best thing you can do is make sure you get yourself one of these.
conditions, such as kidney, liver or bleeding problems. ready to change your routine? ask your doctor about once-a-day xarelto®. for more information including cost support options, call 1-888-xarelto or visit goxarelto.com. >>> hello, everyone. topping off our agenda, we have a top story with regard to some deadly gun violence. we have three marines killed overnight at the base in quantico. virginia. and a violent shooting in texas. we are beginning at the marine base in quantico. that is where authorities say two marines were shot to death last night at the officer candidate school. it happened as a result of a fell loma reason who later killed himself. the base commander, overcome with grief as he talked about the tragedy this morning. >> i'd also ask for the support of our neighbors, the community and their thoughts and prayers as well. for our marines who have lost their, their comrades in arms. >>> mean while, a violent twist in the investigation of two brutal murders in colorado. we have a colorado paroly who is injured in texas. after he has been in a shootout with police. >> he ca
, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, vision changes or eye pain, or problems passing urine. other side effects include dry mouth and constipation. nothing can reverse copd. spiriva helps me breathe better. (blowing sound) ask your doctor about spiriva. it's delicious. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take an idea and make it happen. i'm janet long and i formed my toffee company through legalzoom. i never really thought i would make money doing what i love. [ robert ] we created legalzoom to help people start their business and launch their dreams. go to legalzoom.com today and make your business dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. >>> at the top of the show, we asked you why you are awake? dan, what do you have? >> a couple of tweets. i'm awake from my daily vocabulary lesson. thanks for explaining the word crater. >> i'm here to educate everyone. >> i'm up to see what tie you chose today. come on, bill, you can do better. >> i know. i chickened out. i had one, it was a little more risque, tomorrow i'll go bold. all r
on something like gay rights opinions are changing fast. on the other side of that question, how cognizant are the justices of how their actions shape the country's view of the court? the country's view of that institution that they represent and its legitimacy in our system of government. a couple of months ago former justice sandra day o'connor did a interview in parade magazine of all place in which she was asked about public approval ratings for supreme court justices. public approval of the justices had dropped from something like two-thirds, roughly 66% in the late 1980s down to 44% now. justice o'connor responded by saying she thought that drop was disturbing, and that, quote, i thinkurmre may have been a turning point. she publishes a remarkable photograph that have i not seen anywhere else before i saw it in this book. it's taken on inauguration day this 2001. justice o'connor, her husband on the right, justice scalia and chief justice rehnquist are waiting for the inauguration of george w. bush to start. an inauguration made possible by virtue of the decision bush v. gore. and i
of change in washington. the old guard of the republican party seems to have lost its authority and maybe its mind. now the young guns in the party are taking center stage. who are these new stars? we're going to fill in the blanks just ahead. please don't forget free market capitalism is the best path to prosperity. it is business, not the government or the federal reserve that ultimately creates those jobs. i'm kudlow. we'll be right back. ♪ than the sun ♪ tonight carfirmation. only hertz gives you a carfirmation. hey, this is challenger. i'll be waiting for you in stall 5. it confirms your reservation and the location your car is in, the moment you land. it's just another way you'll be traveling at the speed of hertz. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. >>> so there's a new group of leaders emerging f
. the question is, is the congress envisioned by our founders still able to meet the changing needs of our country? the key word is able to meet the changing needs of our country. i think we get a strong vote no. but we ask for those watching at home to vote and see if congress is able to immediate those -- meet those needs. we're being live streamed on the policy center website. or you can tweet us husing the hashtag engage u.s.a. later in the program i will read your twitter comments. first i want to get back to our panel. i want to go to senator daschle. senator snow laid out a range of useful reforms but she said something that struck me and i'm paraphrasing. she said it hasn't always been like this. in the past there has been a way for leaders and members of both parties to get along despite of their differences. you and i were joking backstage that when you said majority leader, congress functioned perfectly, like a well-running clock. no one ever disagreed on anything and it was all comedy. i might be exaggerating slightly. but in all seriousness that the challenges of the governmen
of changes unless you want to screw with some of the numbers in the report. they really did not do a lot. jeff: this is rallying today based on the report. >> it will still attract a lot of planting this year. we did not change a lot of the numbers. now we are looking at march 28. jeff: tell me about this, this exchange had a lot of funds in, a lot of funds, a lot of investment. >> they got a little bit ahead of themselves. dollar-denominated products should automatically go up. we are going to be inflating. those people had to take their money back out. jeff: we look at soybeans today. also, perish on soybeans. perish on wheat today. the volumes are so thin. it is typical. jeff: scott, appreciate it so much. alwayy nice to see you. what can i tell you. is pretty much just unchanged. tracy: jeff flock, thank you very much. ashley: the safe haven seem to be slipping away as more and more americans are dipping into retirement savings just to get by. the largest mutual fund company says people taking out loans against their account is just 12% said 2008. tracy: america not voted the top cou
is that there are certain times you can change people's minds. as a heart surgeon i don't have a lot of control what people do after the surgery. i've already done my work and they are on their way. i long ago pledged i would never operate on smokers, and i don't. and i don't say that because i dislike smokers. i say because i care about them. but i tell them is when you come to see me if you don't stop smoking you obviously don't value this process we aren't going to go ahead. but i can work with you and we can get you to stop. now is our moment of change. i don't remember feeling in that endeavor. people don't realize the success rate for stopping is about 5% if you do it on your own, cold turkey. you can do it but it's 5%. if you use appropriate mechanisms including medications, it's closer to 45%. and smokers begin to think that it differently. the key message -- and i'm going to come back to this because it's important for us -- the reason they do this is because you need to care about yourself the way we care about you. that changes the dynamic of the message energetically people are hearing. it's no
of that year which then changed the california constitution to eliminate that california supreme court decision. in the interim 18,000 same-sex couples got married in california. the first challenge was to whether or not proposition 8 was really a revision of the california constitution and had to go through the legislature, the california supreme court said, no, no, no, it's an amendment to the constitution, so challenge, a challenge to proposition 8 under the california constitutioning is not going to work pause -- constitution is not going to work because it's an amendment to the constitution. .. intervened in the case. now, at that point the attorney general mcgovern was still parties to the case. they were defendants in the case so that was a clear case or controversy. they were enforcing the law and the interveners, therefore, could piggyback on the standing of the actual parties. when the decision came down we had a 12 day trial, with evidence from all kinds of experts and plaintiffs and other individuals. the district judge found proposition eight unconstitutional on the grounds that we
what i sense from a lot of people i've been talking to is this fear that somehow america has changed, our people has changed, that we reached this point in time and we have too many people in america that want too much from government and that maybe the changes that have happened are irreversible and that it will never be the same again. i want you to understand that's not true. our people have not changed. the vast majority of the american people are hardworking taxpayers who take responsibility for their families, go to work every day. they pay their mortgage on time. they volunteer in the community. this is what the vast majority of american people still are. what's changed is the world around us. it's changed in dramatic ways. just think how much the world has changed in the last 10 years. the global economy is real. we don't live in a national economy any more. everything you buy, everything you sell, everything you touch it's all impacted by things that are happening halfway around the world. the information age is real. it's made our lives easier. it's allowed you right now to
how did you come to the changing our thinking on this interesting topic? >> this topic of felch terse hawk in dove gets people riled up. you want to have a debate you bring up the word of voucher and people have very strong opinions. i am a democrat. i spent my entire life since i was in the second grade and i said what's the difference between a republican and democrat he said democrats care more about, you know, the people that have less and republicans want to make money to the i said well i am a democrat. and i have been ever since. and so when i got to d.c. what education reform should look like and what it shouldn't and where i drew a bright line on the vouchers because in the democratic party we think they are bad because you are taking money away from the schools that need it the most and only helping a few kids. when i arrived in washington, we had a publicly funded voucher program, and people -- it was about to be free authorized and people wanted me to lehane monegan you are the top education official. what do you think about the program? do pretty much knew what i thought
the "wall street journal," columnist says something has changed, a line has been crossed. does it feel that way in washington? >> now, i think so republicans learned a pretty good lesson this week. the president overhyped this thing electing like y 2 q, he couldn't back up his -- y2k ands president's bluff. we're not talking about a massive cut here in spending. we're talking about a minor cut in the growth of spending. i think our country wants to see us get serious about spending and i think the party learned a good lesson to stand up to the president, being very clear offering solutions to problems. at the end of the day if the president isn't willing to lead and anything he is interested in campaigning earnings this we have to stick together and show the american people that we're not going to drive this country into the ground. >> dana: one of the things i have seen from democrats and even just outside of the party politics, from the left is that we actually don't have a spending problem. this is a new talking point. just looking at the polls, actually one thing americans can agre
that began 30 years ago, this could be a change in the fight against hiv and aids. doctors say a baby in mississippi born with hiv has been cured. the baby received aggressive treatment just 30 hours after birth. the child would be the second in the world considered cured. director of national ins turt of al allergy and diseases good morning. >> good morning. >> is this a cure? if so, what are the implications? >> it's very likely a cure. the implications need to be determined because you're talking about a single case and it's really more of a hypothesis developing or driving situation, where we need to see if this is going to be applicable. it looks like under the unusual circumstances that this is indeed a cure because the pediatricians aggressively treated the baby essentially immediately after birth, which is the time of infection as opposed to waiting to see if the baby was indeed affected. it was an aggressive approach that proved to be correct. whether or not this is going to be broadly applicable to children really remains to be determined. it is an import
-- >> that's pocket change. literally pocket change for warren buffett. >> what did he say, his perspective is always interesting. >> his demeanor -- >> even when it comes to newspapers. >> local is still important. >> if he still likes stocks and likes companies, shouldn't people at home like stocks and companies? he's a thoughtful man. i like him. >> let's talk about the markets overall as we start the week. the dow starting within 75 points of its all-time closing high. the markets are facing some headwinds. you have continued wrangling in washington over the sequester. data showing the wealthy shouldering the load in consumer spending. futures are lower after a sell-off in the shanghai market after beijing announced new property buying restrictions. you add all these things together, jim, and you think slowing growth around the world. we also, of course, got the terrible pmis on friday which showed slowing in europe, across europe. >> the best performing groups, augmented by the purchase of heinz, are these companies that do really well in a slow economy. kimberly, clorox, they're very
take great offense to that. maybe it's just a change of emphasis maybe he's more focused on the short term and i'm more focused on the long term. but i think paul said on the show and he believes it, congress can't do two things at once. it can't grow the economy now and focus on the long term. i would say i was influenced by paul krugman and who what he wrote back in the 1990s, what he wrote in materially 2000 united statess. in the 1990s, i've got to say, you would have been a member of newt's anti-debt party. >> no. >> in the 1990s you look at your books, your writings and you said it was startingly irresponsible for the federal government to run deficits because you talked about this coming army of baby boomers and you've said it was going to hit in 2012 and that's when we needed to be ready. >> but the point is it was irresponsible to be running deficits when the economy was at full employment. and it didn't need the support from the federal government. we mised that window. we didn't do it. we didn't pay down the debt when the economy was fairly strong. now we're in a situation
it will be changed in the smeet. basically what the speaker wanted the speaker got and that is we now have an austerity budget and that's going to be, i think, a killer to the economy, to job growth. what the house gop is now suggesting in terms of keeping the governments open is they'll provide some flexibility for the pentagon, but they don't want to provide the flexibility for any other part of the budget. why be indiscriminant in these cuts to education, to health care, to research, to other vital program that's we're going to provide flexibility for the defense department and we should provide flexibility in every other department. but frankly, i think the whole sequester in this whole aus tirty budget is a real mistake and ought to be done away with and we ought to move to a balanced program. >> as we look at wall street and we put up this graphic, so everybody can watch what we're watching, seeing the dow up 150 points, opening the a all-time highs today, that's wall street. main street is a completely different picture where we have blue collar everyday americans herg our elected o
avenue. >>> it is changing and we have showers up in petaluma and out to the west and there is a little bit of activity north of hayward and the coverage on the south is out in the gilroy area. especially tomorrow we have a few thunderstorms and the weekend things will clear up and we will have updates on mornings on 2. >>> also coming up, we continue to follow that s.w.a.t. team standoff in san francisco and things are changing by the minute. >>> two separate arson incidents at two separate hospitals, stay right here with us. >> reporter: heavy rain and strong winds moving across the bay area overnight. mum, we'll break down rain timing for today and when thunderstorms could be added to the forecast. >>> an intense standoff unfolding at a san francisco pot club this morning. we'll tell you why the s.w.a.t. team was called to this building and we'll tell you about the wanted man we're told is inside. >> reporter: a two-hour police standoff in a quiet neighborhood in san mateo. we will tell you what happened inside the hospital, what workers there are telling us this morning. >>> also --
with schizophrenia who and some with bipolar disorder, when you look at them, there are changes in the green -- brains of people who have the impairment compared to those who do not. 15 of the 18 studies show significant differences in the parts of the green we used to think about ourselves. two other studies have come out in the last year. 17 of 20 studies show the brain is different. yet the laws do not reflect that. unless we have treatments that reflect the fact we're dealing with people who do not understand their sick -- they are sick, the treatments will not be effected. my sister have schizophrenia for 53 years before she died. she never understood she had schizophrenia. i would ask. she thought she has it's a pretty. she would say, and i know you think i have schizophrenia. i would say, why did they keep him in the hospital for 25 years? she would say i had a cold. i do not know why they kept me all that time. unless you deal with a problem in the laws and treatments, we're not going to go anywhere. thank you. >> i want to make three points and get some reaction. we have been talkin
skeptical about this. because of some changes they decided not to change the age at which the medicare changes would begin hitting. republicans have been promising for years now that if you are 55 you will not have to worry about these medicare changes. now the moderates do seem to be on board on the gop conference. host: on the senate side, "the washington times closed what reporting this morning -- it is winning support from other republicans like senator mark o. rubio from florida. talk about that. guest: the senate budget is a little bit more notable in the sense that since 2009 the senate democrats passed the budget. this is going to be a significant political test for them. the senate makes the process more difficult for the democrats over there in the budget speech. they have only a -- they cannot lose a single vote or else the vote would be deadlocked 11-11. patty murray, the chairwoman, has to appease the independent from vermont who causes of the socialist and centrist like mark warner. it is very difficult and they are having trouble over there. the next thing that happens f
this available in supermarkets. it has got to change. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i am sure the prime minister is aware of the pension action group. today, we are meeting with them outside at 12:30, and we would like to invite the prime minister to join a cross-party group who will be meeting on this important date, the fourth anniversary of their campaign. >> i look carefully at what the honorable lady says. i have got a meeting almost straight after with the meeting of her party, so it may not be possible to rearrange my diary, but can i say how important it is that we support pensioners and that they achieve proper dignity in old age. >> mike thornton. >> will the prime minister agree with me that the results where labour failed to gain it shows that the leader of the opposition policies, they are completely and utterly, completely and utterly without any support in the country as a whole? i welcome the honorable gentleman. i welcome the honorable gentleman's comments, and i think he will get along just fine. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by
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